Tag: Hotel Etiquette

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Hotel Employees, For Better Or Worse, Are Using The Internet To Tell It Like It Is

August 22, 2012 at 9:33 AM | by | Comments (3)

Working in a hotel must be tough. Between the constant upkeep of rooms, the late hours, the cranky guests, we imagine most hotel staffers are always on the verge of snapping. Come to think of it, they probably could benefit from a little venting once in a while...

Well, that's exactly what happened in an online discussion thread asking hotel employees to share secrets they normally keep from guests. Started just yesterday, the thread has already accumulated over 5,000 responses, which are alternately helpful, hilarious, and gross—many of them relate specifically to misplaced bodily fluids (yuck).

If you're brave enough to read them, you might wind up with a whole new, slightly paranoid, outlook on life in a hotel room. Here are a few of our favorites...

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Five Etiquette Tips for Hotel High Teas

November 3, 2009 at 1:08 PM | by | Comments (2)

Hotel teas look so inviting, with refined guests sipping chamomile and nibbling on delicate finger sandwiches. But if you're worried that people will gasp you if don't point your pinky the right way while holding a tea cup, don't fret.

We recently went to the Four Seasons Chicago to glean some tea tips so that you won't look like a teatime newbie, or even worse, an uncouth pig.

1. Dress the part.
Okay, you don't have to don white gloves to attend high teas, but dress up. We spotted two ladies in jeans, and while no one shot them disapproving looks, they stood out among the skirts, lady pants and suits in the room.

2. Don't get drunk.
If you choose to get a glass of champagne before your tea, which everyone did in our room except for the jeans-wearing delinquents, try to pad your stomach with some alcohol-soaking food before you arrive. Otherwise, the bubbly will hit your empty stomach quickly and your tipsy party will get a little rowdy and loud, much to the chagrin of the murmuring tea drinkers.

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Your Unrefined Offspring Can Learn a Thing or Two From Taj Boston

Go To The Hotel's Web 
  Site Where: 15 Arlington Street [map], Boston , MA, United States, 02116
November 12, 2008 at 4:04 PM | by | Comments (2)

That seven-year-old child of yours has no business running around, playing with toys, shouting, screaming, touching food with his fingers or even speaking out of turn. Heaven forbid your child actually act like a child — your offspring should be seen and not heard. Right? Maybe?

Well, in the event that you do share these sentiments, you may be inclined to get your personal assistant (or butler or whatever) on the phone to snatch up a spot for your child at a Taj Boston's "Social Style for Children" class and turn your kid into a manners machine.

For $120 per youngin' (including a four-course meal — which we hope consists of kid-friendly foods like macaroni and chicken fingers), Susan Cole of Boston Assemblies has teamed up with the Taj Boston to refine those uncivilized children of yours into impeccably-behaved young ladies and gentlemen.

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Hyatt Place Thinks You Need Etiquette Lessons

August 22, 2008 at 1:28 PM | by | Comments (0)


We are too busy trying to keep Cheeto dust from falling into our keyboard to worry about silly things like etiquette and manners (ha, kidding about the Cheetos), but we recall our mothers telling us to remove our elbows from the table one time. And, of course, we've learned a few social etiquette rules after getting yelled at for double-dipping a chip during our latest soiree featuring margaritas and guacamole.

But when it comes to business etiquette, we don't know so much. Like, is it rude to leave your cell phone on during a meeting? How does one go about mingling with people at a big conference without coming off like a Michael Scott-type?

Hyatt Place -- a chain that's primarily been marketing itself toward business travelers -- thinks you might be like us and may be in dire need of etiquette lessons. But, like, not because you seem ill-equipped to handle real-life social situations -- but because knowing proper etiquette can give you a competitive edge in the business world.

So they called upon Emily Post's great-great-granddaughter (seriously) to help launch an online guide called The Etiquette Effect to help us out.

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